More on the Apexus Tadpole Tent

There is not much information online about this outdoor equipment, so I decided to put in my two cents worth.

I tried searching for the manufacturer’s website but found nothing. I wish they would place their contact information on the box or something. An email address would help.

Anyway, so here’s my latest review on the Apexus Tadpole tent.

Material:

According to the information on the box, the inner tent is made of “breathable nylon”. It did not specify the type though. The sides, running all the way to the back are striped with mesh for better ventilation. It also has a double door that serves the same purpose. The eyelets are rustproof brass.

The rain fly is made of 190T PU coated Nylon. The seams are sealed with water-proof tape. Two double-runner type zippers run the front side of the fly for the “door” and all ten important corners of the fly are sewn with a strap and a shock cord for stability when properly pegged.

The poles are made of lightweight aluminum alloy – a far better material compared to its fiberglass counterparts.

No information about the floor material was provided. I’m guessing it is polyurethane coated nylon.

Rating: 3/5

Weight:

The tent’s trail weight is relatively heavy at 2.35 kilograms*. For a hiker or mountaineer who wants to pack it light, anything above 2 kilograms is a killer. Sure, the extra third of a kilo is considerably light. But not when you’re planning to walk for hours up a mountain with everything in your pack.

Rating: 1/5

Pitching and Striking:

Now this is where the “no-hitch-pitch assembly” kicks in to play. The tent is very easy to pitch; so easy, that one person can set it up in 2 to 3 minutes – from the bag to full on rain proof tent. Plastic clips on straps sewn to the tent make it easy to set up; even easier to strike. One does not have to go through the trouble of maneuvering the poles through narrow sleeves and running back and forth from one end of the tent to another.

The tent comes in its own bag. But I prefer to use a polyester-nylon stuff sack to keep it flat. I like it better that way, because I carry my tent (save for the poles and the pegs) inside my pack, not outside it.

Rating: 4/5

Stability:

Nothing rides out a storm like a tadpole. It’s very aerodynamic.

Rating: 4/5

Price:

I think it’s rather pricey.

Rating: 2/5

Others:

Vestibule – There is not much vestibule area. But there’s enough for your boots and slippers. You would have to sleep with your backpack inside your tent. Rating: 1/5

Pegs – Twelve aluminum pegs are included. Length: 6 inches (end to end including bend) diameter: 5 millimeters. Rating: 3/5 (hey, I would have given it a 4/5 if the pegs were 9 inches long!)

Tensioners – 2 tensioners (guy out lines) are included in the package. Each with its own plastic 8-runner.

I always have a little trouble with the 2-layer door. It does not have clips attached to the cord to hook on to the sides. So I end up having to tie it in a knot with the stitched loop. A minor setback for some, but not for me. Attention to detail is of great importance to me. So I opted to attach a pair of mini carabiners for each layer of door (one for the mesh, and another for the nylon door).

I may still have to add more information about the tent. Feel free to ask me a question by leaving a comment.

Happy trails!

Take nothing but pictures, kill nothing but time, leave nothing but foot prints.

A mountaineer’ s creed

*Owner’s measurement. Weight information is not included in or on the packaging.

54 Responses to “More on the Apexus Tadpole Tent”

  1. Hello!

    I bought myself an Apexus tadpole today direct from the manufacturer. It’s a few hundred pesos cheaper than Bombproof at Galleria. Apexus does not have a propriety website but here is their Multiply site: http://apexus.multiply.com/

    By the way, what is the cord found inside the peg pouch for? Is this the “shock cord”?

    Thanks!

  2. There are no extra shock cords included in the package. Unless the manufacturer gave you some (which I doubt). Shock cords are found inside the aluminum alloy poles.
    What you are referring to are the tensioners or guy out lines. These are used to keep the tent stable in high winds. The plastic 8-runners add tension and keeps the nylon cords taut.

  3. Thanks! Yes, I was not supplied with a spare shock cord. I hope you don’t mind but I have a few more questions. I guess you saw this coming: How do I use the tensioner? A one sentence explanation will do. My previous tent, a Rhino, had no such thing. Also, I tried to set up the tent in my garden and realized that there aren’t enough pegs to fully secure the fly. Or am doing something wrong?

    Thank you very much!

  4. How many pegs came with the package? It’s supposedly 12.
    The rain fly has a total of 12 peg cord slots that you can fix to the ground. Often, I only use 10. The other 2 (peg cords) are for the fly door. Which you can hook to the sides where the fly door zips.

    The tensioners supplied with your tent may be tied to the side straps sewn to the outside of the fly (my tent only has two outside straps, yours may have more since it’s a newer issue), then pegged down to the ground or tied to a tree for additional stability.

    I will send you an email with a photo attachment to further illustrate how a guy out line is used.🙂
    Let me know if you received it.

    Thank you for visiting my site!

  5. Hello D!

    Sorry for the late reply. I was out for a while.

    Yes, I received the diagram. Thank you very much!🙂

    I have twelve pegs. I used six to secure the tent itself and the rest to secure the fly but, having only six left, I was not able to use all peg cord slots on the fly. I read your review and realized you too had only twelve pegs. I find it odd that Apexus supplies its customers with less pegs than the tent+fly can use. Anyway, I think this is meant. I guess I’ll have to buy extra pegs. They’re cheap anyway.

    Well, thanks again for the info! You’re a great help!

  6. I think that the reason behind providing only 12 pegs with the tent is that you dont need to secure the tent with pegs for 2 resons:
    1. The tent is aerodynamic and will not fly like a kite especially when all your other equipment are inside.
    and
    2. (which is the more important reason) You don’t need to use yor pegs on the tent when the rain fly is secured.

    So I end up with 2 extra pegs that allow me to extract the ones secured on the ground when it’s time to strike the tent. I was also able to avoid the extra expenses. :p
    I would recommend though, that you acquire an extra set of 9 or 12-inch pegs.
    You will need these when you pitch your tent on sand.

    Hope this helps.🙂

  7. i just bought an apexus tadpole tent & securing the fly was a puzzle for me when i pitched the tent at home (for practice). can you pls send me the illustration that you sent to philip so i can also benefit from your wisdom🙂 it would be appreciated greatly

    tnx man!

  8. btw, i forgot to leave my email add. it’s baludoy@lycos.com. hope you’d visit yout blog soon so that you can show me how its properly donr. tnx

  9. Aaron,

    I sent you an email regarding your inquiry.
    Hope to hear from you soon.

    Happy Trails!🙂

  10. hi. good thing i read this. I’m planning to buy the apexus tent next week. can you also send me the diagram on how to properly set it up using only 10pegs (which you said left you 2 more pegs). thank you so much. here’s my email: babystels_bratinela03@yahoo.com

  11. Aloha Estella!

    I have no diagram on the tent + peg set up.
    But I hope this helps:

    Like Philip’s (earlier) predicament and inquiry, he too wanted to know how to end up with twpo extra pegs.

    It’s simple, really. Here’s how you do it:
    1. Pitch your tent (don’t forget the ground sheet)
    2. Fix the tent fly.
    3. Peg down the fly (make sure the tent gets proper ventilation).

    Notice that the fly has 12 peg cord slots. Leave the 2 on the fly door. You can always hook it to the sides where the fly door zips.

    Thanks for stopping by. Happy Trails!🙂

  12. Hi! btw nice article here.. I just bought my tadpole last week from the manufacturer and they deliver it to my place for additional P120 which is nice. I just want to ask your opinion about the tent floor because my previous tent was a coleman aerodynamic and the floor is definitely thicker.

  13. Hi Jan!🙂
    I have a question; Why is the Coleman tent now referred to as “former tent”? Maybe because you have reasons for not using it?
    The floor thickness has its advantages and disadvantages. Weight, being the more obvious reason, and second, resistance to wear and tear. The latter should not be a problem if you pack and use a ground sheet (this replaces the more expensive footprint, available only to high end tents).
    It’s always better to wear out the ground sheet than the tent floor. One, because ground sheets are far more economical and easily replaceable. Two, because you don’t have to send the tent back for repairs in case your floor material gets messed up.
    My tent is holding up nicely and is still good as the day I bought it. the material is similar to what the high end brands use and definitely reduces trail weight.
    Thanks for swinging by and reading up.
    Happy Trails!🙂

  14. Hello sir,

    Could you send me also an email with the photo on how to use a guy out line? Here’s my email add: mdawin@yahoo.com

    Thank you,

    Mark

  15. Mark,

    Thank you for swinging by.

    Happy Trails!🙂

  16. Sir,

    Thank you very much for the illustration. It helped me a lot and gave me an idea how to use it. More power!

  17. sir ako din po.. pasend ng pics/illustrations ng 10 peg set up, how to use guy lines and your ground sheet.. by the way san po kakabili ng ground sheet for this kind of tent??? kakabuy ko lang kanina… tnx..

  18. Keeto,

    As far as I know (and don’t take this as bible truth) there is no available footprint for this tent in the market.

    Most outdoors men in the Philippines use a tarp. The kind that looks like its material was made out of very sturdy plastic sack, is either blue on both sides or blue and silver.
    That’s what I use.

    Its not as light and thin as tyvek (material used for tent footprints), but we make use of what we have.🙂

    Just remember the rules of tent pitching:
    1. keep it grounded
    2. keep it dry
    3. make it safe

    Regarding the 10 peg set up – like what I told Estella in the earlier exchange of comments (scroll up, you’ll see it), “I have no diagram on the tent + peg set up.”

    About the guy lines, I’ll need your email addy.

    Thank you for stopping by. Happy trails!🙂

  19. Hi. I’m about to buy a tent, requirements that it be for 1-2 persons, lightweight, and doesn’t cost much. I’m practically a noob in outdoor. My choices are Coleman’s Pioneer 2 tent and the Apexus Tadpole. The Pioneer 2 is so much cheaper (3k+ compared to 5k+ of Apexus). However, when I saw the Pioneer 2 at a Coleman shop, I found it big and heavy. Reading your review, it sounds like the Apexus is not enough value for money. However, I like the easy-pitching because it does not make use of sleeves, and it is more aerodynamic than the Pioneer 2. Any suggestions? Cost is not the main factor, rather the weight, size (especially when packed up), and durability of the tent are the important things for me. I intend to carry my tent inside my pack (50L Conqueror bag). Hoping to commit by next week as I’m going up on the 16th.🙂 Many thanks. My email is honorvirtusetfidelis@yahoo.com

  20. Foma,

    I’d go for the Apexus Tadpole tent any day of the week based on many things.
    Now the review you just read is still subject to individual opinion. I’ve used several tents in the many occasions that I’ve communed with mother nature, and so far, the Apexus Tadpole tent I own has satisfactorily met my simple needs. I still use the old fart, and it’s as good as new. Colors are still bright, comfort is still… well, comforting. :p
    One thing though, If headroom and inside-the-tent-movement is a concern, then I suggest that you go purchase a dome tent. Especially if you’re not scaling a high altitude peak.
    Aerodynamic tents are most suitable for high altitude climbs, making it easier for the climber to pitch and fortify, without having to mess so much with too many guy out lines.
    Also, there are peaks here in the country where there are lots of trees in the campsite. You don’t need an aerodynamic tent there. But if you’re camping in an open area that is subject to hurricane like gusts, then go for a tadpole.
    Of course, you can always just tie down the tent with guy out lines and pegs.

    For every task, there is an appropriate tool.
    Just remember to keep it light and make it fun!🙂

    I used to also have a 50L Conquer backpack before I upgraded to Deuter. It has served me well like my Tadpole.

    Remember, no one else will carry what you lug around in your pack but you.

    This site might help:

    Mountaineering Tents:
    http://www.abc-of-mountaineering.com/info/mountaineering-tents.asp

    Pitching Tents:
    http://www.abc-of-hiking.com/hiking-tents/pitching-tents.asp

    Hit me back and tell me about your climb, eh?

    Happy Trails!:)

  21. Thank you D!🙂 The Apexus tadpole is currently in-stock at the t3ck webstore. Will contact them ASAP to confirm if it’s in-stock.

    Target on the 16th is Mt Batulao. Because I’m sloooooooooooooooooow, pacing will be leisurely (read: annoyingly slow for the more experienced guys) hehehe Good thing the friends who’ll be with me are understanding and patient hahaha! Taking new trail up, old trail down.🙂 May I request an illustration for the guy lines as well?

    Thank you for the links!🙂

  22. Foma,

    You’re welcome.

    Let me know if I may be of further assistance.

    Happy Trails!🙂

  23. Update: Well, the Apexus tadpole apparently isn’t in stock. Instead, I’m getting the Jetstream, which is basically the same tadpole tent, using the same materials and construction, the only difference is the name of the manufacturer. Hopefully will arrive at the office on Tuesday. I can’t wait.😀

  24. Cool!🙂

    Only 2 days to the climb. Hope you have fun ot there.

    Happy Trails!

  25. dangerpistola23@yahoo.com .. thanks.. how bput sir yung sideout?? yung tadpole nila.. ok din ba yun??? compare sa apexus??

  26. Sir, Ground sheet for apexus is available from the manufacturer it cost 150.00. it is also available at Sandugo store at Trinoma though it costs much higher… I suggest that if ypu would buy an apexus tent purchase it straight from the supplier you can save almost 1k for a tadpole tent. you can get the contact details from their multiply site. http://www.apexus.multiply.com.

  27. Sid,

    Thank you for that very valuable information.🙂

    There you have it dear readers. Go get em.🙂

  28. I observed a few things though:
    1. The proprietor never directly answered the question, “how much” on the web page, and a few other questions that play a major role in one’s considerations when purchasing a product. BUT, he may have sent a PM to the inquiring public. Save for myself, I never got one for my inquiry.
    2. I asked for specifications. No Answer. IMHO, the proprietor should address all business inquiries, lest he leaves an incorrect impression with his current and would-be customers.
    3. Limited Photos. No Updates.
    4. He sells a competitive product. World class – something that can compete with international brands. He should b proud! MADE IN THE PHILIPPINES!😀

  29. Keeto,

    I sent you an email with the requested photo (how to use guy out lines).
    And if you read the thread carefully, you’ll find out that you can purchase the foot print locally.😉

  30. Hi D,

    I’ve been using my Jetstream tadpole in my overnight climbs. Very satisfied.🙂 I replaced the pegs though, using lighter, Y-shaped pegs instead, which cuts down the weight somewhat.

    Reason for posting this comment is to inquire how to use the guy lines. Can you send me the same email you sent to keeto? I haven’t used the guy lines yet, but will do so if I find myself going up Tarak or staying at windy campsites in the future.

    Thanks again!🙂

  31. Hello sir,
    Could you send me also an email with the photo
    on how to use a guy out line? Here ’s my email
    add:jed_pen@yahoo.com
    Thank you,
    jed

  32. Hello sir,
    Could you send me an email with the photo
    on how to use a guy out line?my email
    add..jed_pen@yahoo.com
    Thanks
    jed

  33. hi sir,
    can u send me also the photo how to use the guy out lines.
    My email is brian.orfano@sunpowercorp.com
    thanks!

  34. Hi can you also send the diagram to me darklightred83@yahoo.com.ph
    Thanks

  35. hello, good day. i hope you could also send me a diagram. i am planning to buy the apexus tadpole tent by the end of this week. thank you in advance.
    redbutterfly_00@hotmail.com

  36. Bang,
    Sent you the Guy Line Diagram.
    Hope that helps.

    Thanks for swinging by.🙂 Happy trails!

  37. Hello sir,

    Could you send me also an email with the photo on how to use a guy out line and diagram? Here’s my email add: deuzcrack@yahoo.com

    Thank you in advance!

    Deuz

  38. Hi Sir,

    I’m planning to buy a tadpole tent and my options are the Apexus and the Jetsream. I hope you don’ mind, can provide me with the little bit of input about these 2 tent? Is it really waterproof? Can it withstand a whole day of rain without leaking inside? If you’re going to buy which of the 2 would you prefer and why?

    And also can you send me the details about using the guy lines as well?
    ds.031219.mn@gmail.com

    I apologize if I have a lot of questions, any information from you would be a great help. Thanks a lot!!

  39. Dan,
    I have not tried camping out in the jetstream, so I would not have valuable information for you.
    However, I think my review in the Apexus Tadpole is quite comprehensive.

    You may view and download the guy lines diagram here:

    Hope this helps.

    Thanks for swinging by. Happy Trails!🙂

  40. sir,

    i’m still having a hard time of whether to buy a tent or a new hiking boots. for the tent i saw an alps mountaineering zephyr 2 for only 5.3k over the internet, so now I’m also having a hard-time whether to buy an apexus tadpole or that alps zephyr 2 tent…😦

  41. Potboy,

    I got my hiking boots from a local thrift shop; “Ukay-ukay” as we know it. The boots are almost brand new, and it fits good too.
    I wanted to save money so I could get both a tent and a good pair of boots, so I resorted to waiting it out until the thrift shops had the pair I wanted. Believe me, there are lots out there.

    Now, about the tent, I suggest that you look at both the advantages and disadvantages of both products you’re considering.
    You might want to consider the materials used, and the simple things that you might need. One tent might have a small advantage over the other. For example, the zipper runners, the floor material, the door size, the gear pockets inside, the loop ties, etc.

    If you don’t have an immediate need for it, don’t rush into purchasing a tent. afterall, you’ll be using it for a long time.
    Unless ofcourse, if you’re to sell it anyway.

    Happy Trails!

  42. Hi sir D..

    I just want to ask something, till now are you using your apexus tadpole tent?

    Im just wondering, and playing on my mind that if its a satisfaction guaranteed to buy with the same tent that youve be using for this time?😀

    Im planning to buy a Apexus Tadpole Tent too, direct to the manufacturer, preparation for the freedom climb 2011 this June 😀 are you going to climb also to this event?

    bytheway.. in behalf of newbies like me posting in your forum…Thanks for all the information that youve given/ shared to all of us!😀 KUDOS to you sir!😀 you did a great job for us! hope i can climb with you..😀 soon~

    Thanks in Adavance!

  43. Jao,
    You’re welcome!🙂

    Every once in a while, I would take it out and use it.🙂

    I would recommend that you get feedback from various individuals who are using different tents; and then, some more feedback from other apexus tadpole tent users.

    Every outdoorsman has a different level of comfort and a unique set of needs when communing with mother nature. Before you purchase yur tent, I suggest that you borrow one from a friend, sleep in it in your backyard in different weather conditions and then make a choice.

    Hope this helps.

    Happy Trails!🙂

  44. Jao,

    Oh, and uh… about your question; if I will join the freedom climb in June; I still am not sure. Because I also got an invite for a freedom ride around the same dates. However, Should I go and climb, you’ll know it’s me. Just look for the guy with a tribal half-sleeve ink and a “Screaming pink” rain fly on his tent.

    • hahaha when the day comes and I saw a tribal half-sleeve ink and a “Screaming Pink” rain fly sheet, i’ll gonna disturb you and have a coffee break with you😀

      again.. thanks!

  45. Hi Sir!

    Nice article. Kudos! I’m torn between two tents, The Apexus tadpole (which I could get for 5k) or the Sideout tadpole (4k). What are your thoughts on the two? they say that Sideout has more head room (I’m 5’10”, so it will be more comfortable for me while sitting inside). What are your thoughts?

    Thanks!

    • Hi Arvee,

      Where did you see the apexus tadpole tent, ive been looking for till now for that tent to a outdoorshop? can you help me regarding to this matter?

      Thanks!

  46. AnakAmaGuro Says:

    Hello Arvee.

    I say, don’t just take another person’s word for it. If the shop you’re visiting has both tents, I suggest you have the store attendant pitch both tents for you to try out. Sit inside and get a feel of the tent. If head room is priority, then everything else will only come in second – like, inside compartments or pockets, hang loops (where you could clip things on like a flashlight , tent light or better yet, a gear hammock).

    While you’re in there sitting, consider the temperature too. A good breathable tent is top choice in this country’s climate. However, you must also consider how the temperature changes when the fly is attached. Ask yourself, “which months do I like to camp out?” Because you’ll need a warm, yet breathable tent in the colder months and a well ventilated tent in the sunny months.

    Then, stand outside. See which tent gives you less of a back pain when striking, pitching, pegging, entering and exiting it. This is vital, because you don’t want a bad back should you need to quickly move from one camp site to another. Make your tent use and experience hassle free.

    Anyway, what does the sideout tent look like, is it also a tadpole? I’m assuming it is.

    But if it’s headroom you want, look for a nice, functional dome tent.
    Want it a bit more aero dynamic? Try Apexus’ Halcon tent. It’s a streamlined dome tent.

    Hope this helps.🙂 Thanks for swinging by. Happy Trails! 8)

  47. Hi D,

    Can you help me? Im in at sucat-parañaque, do you have any idea where can I buy a Apexus tadpole tent? except from the manufacturer?

    I already go the nearest outdoor store here but the product is out of stock…
    even calling all outdoor stores within metro manila, again its out of stock!😦 huhuhuhu… the freedom climb is getting closer… I need a tent now😦

    Anyone? can help me?

    Thanks in advance😀

  48. AnakAmaGuro Says:

    Jao,

    You can try online ads for the tent. There are lots out there. that is, if you don’t mind using a pre-owned tent.😉
    I also heard that Conquer Sells tadpole tents. They have a shop in Robinson’s Pioneer in Mandaluyong.
    Here’s the info I found:
    Conquer outdoor shop located at 2nd level Robinsons Pioneer, Mandaluyong city
    Tel: 747-07-26

    You might also want to try these links:
    Outdoor Shops – Metro Manila
    The Filipino Mountaineer’s Site
    Hope this helps.🙂

  49. D,

    Thanks, ill try to call this later.. hehehhe im at the office and its prohibited to make a outside call even browsing other sites like this… good luck to me if they found out im doing this such a bad staff LOLZ😀

    thanks

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