Archive for Anawangin Cove

Anawangin Cove – How to get there and what to remember

Posted in Gear, Outdoor Equipment, Places, Travel, Outdoors, Places with tags , , , , , , , , on October 29, 2008 by AnakAmaGuro

Everybody’s been asking me how to get to Anawangin Cove. Questions like, “what do I bring? How much do you have to shell out? Is there a bathroom?and just about anything one can think of.

Well, here it is.

Please note that some of the quoted prices may change or may have changed, AND STRICTLY ADHERE TO THE REMINDERS THAT I CAREFULLY WROTE IN RED FONT.

Also: The boatmans’ numbers may have changed. I’ll ask around and update you guys on it. J

Budget for a 2-day stay: One source says, “I’ve spent about 2k-2500”

I say, about P1k to P1500 will do.

What to bring:

Individual checklist:

Money

Tent

Mess kit (spoon, fork, plate, tumbler)

Drinking water / also for cooking (3 liters per person)

Sun block

Sunglasses

Insect repellant (lotion or spray)

Personal medication

Bathing suits

Slippers

Toilet paper / wet wipes

Toiletries (i.e. Toothpaste, toothbrush, soap, shampoo, panty liners – for the females)

Dry gear bags (plastic bags would be a good substitute) for your wet clothes

Plastic bags for your trash

Waterproof bags; a zip lock bag will do (for your money, cell phone, camera, etc).

Folding stool

Group Checklist:

Cook set (pots and pans)

Stove

Lantern

We need to pitch in for the purchase of:

Lighter fluid (for the stove) or coal should you like to do a beach barbecue.

Optional equipment:

Umbrella

Raincoat / Poncho

It’ll be cool if you can bring a hammock.

– I know I will J

Where to get a Ride?

Bus Terminal: Victory Liner, Caloocan

Visit: http://www.victoryliner.com/tripschedules1.htm for schedules.

Now you ask me, why the Caloocan terminal?

Answer: Because it’s the only terminal that fares to Zambales on an hourly basis.

From Caloocan to Zambales (Iba)

  • 5:00AM—————————————————P291.00(one-way only)
  • 6:00AM
  • 7:00AM
  • 8:00AM
  • 9:00AM
  • 10:00AM
  • 11:00AM
  • 12:00NN
  • 1:00PM
  • 2:00PM
  • 4:00PM
  • 5:00PM
  • 6:00PM
  • 11:30PM


From Caloocan to Zambales (Sta. Cruz)

  • 5:30AM—————————————————P384.00 (one-way only)
  • 7:30AM
  • 8:30AM
  • 9:30AM
  • 10:30AM
  • 12:30NN
  • 3:00PM
  • 8:00PM
  • 12:00MN

Fare: Php207

Travel Time: 3-4hrs (including stop-overs)

You get off at: San Antonio Town Proper

Then you take a: Trike to Pundaquit

And the fare is: 40 per head

Travel time is: 5-10 minutes

You get off at: Pundaquit beach

Info from another source (which I guess is not as recent):

After getting off at the Municipal Hall of San Antonio, take a tricycle going to Pundaquit Beach and that would cost Php15/head.

Note:

Do not go to Nora’s Beach Resort if you don’t intend to pay the 150Php entrance and 1600 (roundtrip) boat to Anawangin.

Then you take a: Boat

Note:

Florante Lavesoria (boatman); contact number: (0910) 805-3388, he charges 1k roundtrip. They’ll give you a visit at your campsite the next day and ask if you’ll need anything from Pundaquit market (cigarettes, soda, and ice). Ask also about supplies that you might need, like coolers, etc. they may be able to provide that for you too.

I got a recent contact number for another boatman. He charges 700 PHP (to and fro). Here’s the number: 0918 – 427 – 1543

And the fare is: 1k roundtrip

Travel time is: 5-10 minutes

You get off at: Anawangin cove

There’s no cell phone signal or electricity in the cove.

There are nearby islands that are also wonderful. Ask a boat man to take you to Capones Island and Camera Island. Both Islands are very wonderful. Capones has a lighthouse; you might want to go there and take pictures.

Now what?

You can camp anywhere. But the spot where the flags are charge an entrance fee of Php150, but they have toilets and grill (ihaw) stations, huts, and eating areas. They have their own care taker.

The cove is very, very clean. We should keep it that way at all times. Collect all your trash in a large garbage bag(s) and bring it back to Pundaquit instead of leaving it at the beach. Nobody else will clean after you. Avoid throwing cigarette butts anywhere especially on the fresh waters. Leave no trace.

Now we need to know:

1. Where we can use the bathroom

You can either use the ones at the area with the flags, but they might ask you to pay for the use.

Or you can go to Aling Puring’s; a 3-5 minute walk through the woods and across the stream (which is about knee deep). They have a manual water pump if you want to take a clean bath. This is good exercise, since you have to pump your own water. You may opt to use the bushes or hide behind the trees to relieve yourself, but be sure to clean up afterwards (dig a hole and give it back to Mother Nature!J).

2. Where to get potable water (or do we bring it?)

See checklist for the suggested amount of water to bring.

3. Is a bonfire allowed?

It is allowed. Choose a safe area away from short trees to avoid wild fires. Clean up the bonfire area in the morning (cover it with sand after which). Leave no trace.

  • Make sure to completely extinguish fire.
  • Scatter ashes or embers out.
  • Sprinkle with water. Stir with a stick. Repeat.
  • Drench charred logs.
  • Repeat until everything is cold.

4. Is there a restriction to the number of campers in a particular spot?

No

You may choose to donate your excess food and other supplies to Aling Puring. Their house is just right at the middle of the beach area.

IMPORTANT:

Do not use soap in the stream to wash your dishes or bathe. I extremely discourage this.

Pack out what you pack in.

Don’t leave your trash in Anawangin or with the caretakers because they will burn them and that’s not good. Don’t leave your trash with the boatman because they might throw it to the sea and that’s not good either. You can leave it in Pundaquit, in the boatman’s house. Or you can bring your trash to Manila – of course that was a lousy joke. Insert awkward silence here.

(Looks around without moving head, clears throat) anyway…

Remember: Take nothing but pictures, Kill nothing but time, Leave nothing but footprints.

Visit this site for Camping tips and Advice: http://www.lovetheoutdoors.com/camping/Tips/Tips_and_Advice.htm

It’s best to read up, and prepare. It works for first time campers, even for experienced outdoorsmen.

Help Anawangin Cove

Posted in Places, Thoughts, Travel, Outdoors, Places with tags , , , , , , on April 15, 2008 by AnakAmaGuro

View of the cove from the hill

It’s a place you wouldn’t expect to find in Zambales. I visited this little piece of paradise last March 22, 2008 and it was a trip indeed worth taking.

I’ve heard about it from friends, acquaintances and read quite a few interesting stories online. Yet nothing compares to experiencing the cove itself.

Ruben, a local from Pundaquit, who also happened to be the boatman who ferried us from Pundaquit to Anawangin (well, it was his brother, Noli, who actually operated the boat that took us to the cove), informed us that there have been visitors, who chose to trek their way to the cove and enjoyed the scenery. There are even stories of hikers finding caves, waterfalls, crystal clear pools, and sightings of beautiful birds. That immediately enticed the outdoorsman in me.

There is even this famed lighthouse standing proud and tall atop a hill on Capones Island. Which by the way, I wasn’t able to visit. * sigh *.

But what little I experienced in those two days I was there is indeed a treasure to cherish.

I’m not very good with a camera so forgive me if the photos do not seem pro-looking. I still have a lot to learn, I must admit. But the album I’ve compiled will have to do for now.

The place is unquestionably beautiful, indescribable even. Yet amidst all that beauty lie sadness. What once was a place of solace is now slowly turning into a commercial camp ground. Visitors come and go like it was just a trip to the park.

I guess they haven’t heard of the phrase “leave no trace” or “leave it like you found it”. Most campers just leave their trash like there was someone to clean up after them. It’s sad, and it breaks my heart to see that there are still so many who have no respect for the environment.

It’s pretty simple. Pack out what you pack in. Imagine someone coming to your home and leaving a big, ugly, muddy footprint on your expensive Persian carpet. I’m sure you’d freak out too.

Mother Nature and the cove’s residents are pleading for help. It takes no more than a simple sense of responsibility to preserve what little is left of this paradise island. Let’s give our fair share and help the environment heal. It took hundreds of years for all this beauty to become what it is right now. It will only take a few months and a few more irresponsible, half-witted campers to destroy it.

I would still want to see the day when my children and my children’s children get to experience what I have experienced in my days. What we leave behind, we leave to our children.

I was thinking of proposing a simple method to help keep the visitors aware. No, not signboards nailed to the trees or staked to the sand in the cove. I was thinking more in the lines of a pre-boat-ride-orientation.

Since the boatmen of Pundaquit, Zambales ferry the tourists to the islands (Camera Island, Capones – where the light house is; and Anawangin), they will be the first to make the visitors aware.
A 15 to 30 minute orientation that includes registering the guests should be a pre-requisite. Visitors will be required to bring with them trash bags that they will use all through out their stay in the islands. Smokers will pack a small plastic bag where they can ditch their cigarette butts, greatly decreasing the chances of them throwing it just about everywhere.
All these are to be brought back to Pundaquit where the trash can be properly disposed of.

All this will guarantee a whole lot of things that we can all look forward to, especially the locals; continuous flow of visitors and tourists to the islands, which equates to jobs for the boatmen as an alternative to fishing; a piece of paradise, for generations to come.

I’m coming back to Anawangin before this month ends and give my fair share.

“Kill nothing but time, take nothing but pictures, leave nothing but foot prints.”

Help save Anawangin Cove. Read more from Chris’ and Ton’s posts.