Archive for Outdoor equipment

The North Face Tephra 22

Posted in Cool Stuff, Gear, Travel, Outdoors, Places with tags , , , , on June 8, 2009 by AnakAmaGuro

The North Face Tephra 22 2008

The North Face Tephra 22 2008

I recently acquired a brand new tent from a colleague.

Prior to that, I did a little research on how much the local distributors sell it for. And I got mine for almost half the price.

I pitched it when I got home and it didn’t take me more than 5 minutes to complete the task – tent to fly.

I’ll Post a review as soon as I get the chance to test it. 🙂

Apexus Tadpole Classic Tent

Posted in Gear, Outdoor Equipment with tags , , , , , , on April 16, 2008 by AnakAmaGuro

A dome tent is nice, but I chose to purchase a tadpole. I wanted my tent to be aerodynamic – with or without the rain fly.

Sure it doesn’t have much head room, and you’d have to sit with your back to the door or the other way around, with your legs out in the vestibule area… But that’s alright. I don’t need to stand in my tent anyway. I wouldn’t be holding indoor poker games with the entire camp in my tent. It’s my little private spot in the outdoors, and I’d like to keep it that way.

I can always upgrade to a “toad” or a “bullfrog” (as some may call it) should I need to.

Apexus Tadpole TentApexus Tadpole Tent in Alitap

It kept rain at bay and is perfectly breathable. The floor has a nice smooth finish and the indoor mesh pockets are big enough to hold your tent essentials. The poles are made of aluminum alloy, which are stronger, compared to its fiberglass counterparts.

Here are the specs:

Note: Most of it I got off the box; it doesn’t provide much information though. 😛

•Poles: Special Aluminum Alloy. Flexible, Collapsible

•Fly: Nylon 190T PU coated, Waterproof tape-sealed seam

•Inner Tent: Breathable Nylon, Nylon Mesh for better ventilation

2-layered door for ventilation control

•Eyelet: Rustproof Brass

•Dimension: 215cm x 130cm x 95cm

•Weight: 2.35kg (trail weight: including poles and pegs)

•Sleeps: 2

The tent is aerodynamically designed for high-altitude climbing to stand against strong winds. Clip provided for no-hitch-pitch assembly.

Full cover waterproof rain fly provides maximum protection and stability.

Extended vestibule for Kitchen and storage.

Elegant, lightweight collapsible aluminum alloy poles, interconnected by shock cords for easy pitching and striking.

Aluminum pegs provided (12)

Stuff sacks (for pegs and poles) and carrying bag included.

Investing on good equipment will guarantee you happy times in the great outdoors.

Happy Trails!

Take nothing but pictures, kill nothing but time, leave nothing but foot prints.

A mountaineer’ s creed

The Coleman Peak 1 Feather 400 – a camping stove for keeps

Posted in Gear, Outdoor Equipment, Reviews with tags , , , , , on April 16, 2008 by AnakAmaGuro

This was the first of many stoves I’ve had the chance of using. My first encounter with this beautiful piece of equipment was in 1996 during my first hike up a mountain in Laguna (Philippines). I fell in love with it instantly.

Since I was a beginner, I didn’t have all the equipment I needed for the trip. Besides, there were only 6 of us and it was just a weekend getaway.

The stove was on its (probably) 6th year of service. It started beautifully and kept a good groove. It needed no priming since the Philippines is a tropical country and we’re only (approximately) 290 to 300 MASL (Meters Above Sea Level).

Whether turning down the flames for simmering rice or cranking it up to full blast, the Feather 400 works wonders. Its flame adjusts beautifully, and will keep working as long as it has fuel.

I’ve read some reviews online and here’s a testimony that really caught my eye. One owner said:

“Just pulled out my old model 400 from a drawer in the cellar after 20 years of disuse.
I noticed that is still had some fuel in it, so I took it outside for test. Wow, started up just like it used too. After a minute or two I had a beautiful, even, fully adjustable, blue flame. Remarkable.”

I also learned (the hard way) that filling the tank to 3 quarters of its capacity with fuel is best. That’s about 8oz of white gas. It provides enough space to generate pressure after pumping and will last for about 2 to 3 days of cooking full meals for 2 to 3 persons.

I bought mine 2 years ago (yes, it’s available here in Manila!) and I have not sent it to a service shop or worried about it wearing down anytime soon. It’s sturdy, compact and easy to use. Pump, light and go! Three easy steps – how simple is that?

I tried checking it out at Coleman’s website and I learned that the product is no longer available. They came up with a newer version though. It’s a dual fuel stove that burns both white gas and unleaded gasoline – the Feather 442. But that’s another story.

Here are the specs. In case you’re curious.

Specifications

Weight without Fuel: 1lb 6oz
Weight with Fuel: 2lb 1oz
Dimensions: 6 3/8″ x 4 5/8″
Fuel Type: White Gas
Fuel Capacity: 11.8 oz
Average Boil Time: 1 Qt. – 4.5 min.
Burn Time, High: 1 hr 15 min
Burn Time, Simmer: 2 hr 20 min
*BTU’s: 7,500

* British Thermal Unit – In North America, the term “BTU” is used to describe the heat value (energy content) of fuels, and also to describe the power of heating and cooling systems, such as furnaces, stoves, barbecue grills, and air conditioners.

I’m looking forward to handing it down to my son; but not anytime soon. 😉